General Business Courses

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Courses

GB 101 The World of Business (3 credits)

Note: Not open to freshmen that started in Fall 2009 or after

This course is taught by faculty from all the business-related areas of the college. All freshman business majors are required to take this course. Transfer students who have not taken any business courses are advised to take this course, as it is the foundation upon which the business core curriculum is built.

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GB 102 Human Behavior in Organizations (1.5 credits)

Note: Not open to freshmen that started in Fall 2009 or after

Because good ideas and products create positive results only when implemented by people skilled in dealing with others, organizations depend on their employees' abilities to identify and manage human behavior. This course provides an introduction to analytic frameworks from the field of Organizational Behavior through case studies, experiential exercises, lectures and readings.

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GB 103 Legal Environment of Business (1.5 credits)

Note: Not open to freshmen that started in Fall 2009 or after

Provides an overview of the legal issues that confront business managers and executives in both starting a business and operating an existing company. Provides analytical framework to identify legal and ethical issues. Discusses the relationship between business professionals and legal counsel. Interweaves international and ethical issues into the topics covered. Addresses the management of litigation and the settlement of disputes.

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GB 110 Legal & Ethical Environment of Business* (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): Class Code (CC) 1

Note: *Available starting in Fall 2009

Provides an overview of the legal and ethical issues that confront business managers and executives in both starting a business and operating an existing business. Provides an analytical framework to identify legal and ethical issues. Discusses the relationship between business professionals and legal counsel. Discusses topics in contracts, sales, torts, crimes, securities law and Sarbanes-Oxley, business organizations, employment and discrimination and E-commerce. Interweaves international and ethical issues into the topics covered. Includes team assignments where appropriate.

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GB 112 Tools & Concepts in Accounting & Finance* (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): CC1

Note: *Available starting Fall 2009

The primary objective of this course is to provide a foundational understanding of accounting and finance concepts and tools. This course takes students from double-entry accounting through to an elementary understanding of how to construct financial statements. It introduces the use of these statements as the basis for ratio analysis and budgeting. Students begin their study of the basic time value of money concepts that are the foundation for basic valuation techniques for both financial securities and projects valuation.

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GB 201 Financial Reporting and Analysis (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): GB 101

Note: Not open to students who have previously taken AC 121.

Focuses on the fundamentals of financial reporting. The accounting model, transaction analysis, and accounting information systems are introduced. The course emphasizes the concepts that underlie accrual basis accounting so that students can become intelligent users of financial information. Students interpret annual reports and assess the financial strength of a company using ratio analysis. The course discusses how accounting choices and estimates affect the interpretation of financial data. The course encourages students to participate actively in class discussions and to improve their analytical, communication, and inter-personal skills. Professional literature and computer software are integrated into the course.

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GB 202 Accounting Information for Decision Making (1.5 credits)

Prerequisite(s): GB 201

Note: Not open to students who have previously taken AC 122.

Focuses on the managerial uses of accounting information. The course emphasizes how accounting information is used by managers to plan, analyze, and control business operations. Students learn how to analyze business operations using techniques such as cost-volume-profit analysis, break-even analysis, and contribution margins. The role of budgeting in planning business operations is covered. Students prepare pro-forma financial statements. The components of an internal control structure are discussed. The course encourages students to participate actively in class discussions and to improve their analytical, communication, and inter-personal skills. Professional literature and computer software are integrated into the course.

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GB 210 Business Statistics (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): MA 111 or equivalent

Note: Not open to students who have previously taken ST 241 or MA 251 or GB 204 or GB 205

This course develops the basic descriptive and inferential statistical concepts and techniques useful in making a wide range of business decisions. Topics include graphical and numerical techniques for summarizing and describing qualitative and quantitative data; the nature of uncertainty and the basics of probability theory for describing and understanding that uncertainty such as expected value; and the concept of random models including the binomial and normal random variables. An introduction to random sampling and sampling distributions will be presented along with a discussion of the common statistical inference techniques used to analyze the sample data. Specific inferential topics include confidence intervals, hypothesis testing and regression analysis. Numerous examples of business related applications are emphasized throughout the course. The use of Excel for analyzing qualitative and quantitative data sets will be integrated throughout the course material.

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GB 212 Practice & Applications in Accounting & Finance* (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): GB 110 and GB 112

Note: *Available starting in Fall 2010

The primary objective of this course is to extend the foundational understanding of accounting and finance concepts and tools introduced in GB112. This course takes students from an elementary understanding of the prepared financial statements and introduces how to use them in financial decision-making. It covers the analysis of these statements using ratio analysis and the budgeting process using these statements as a starting point for future forecasts. Students will study the funding decisions facing the firm. They will extend their understanding of basic valuation techniques by learning more advanced techniques for valuing both the securities used to raise these funds and the projects to be funded.

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GB 213 Business Statistics* (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): (MA 126 or MA 139 or MA 141) and GB 112 and IT 101

Modern businesses rely on well-educated professionals who can effectively use data to enhance and support decision-making processes. The primary objective of this course is to use data to illustrate key concepts for making decisions throughout each of the primary business disciplines; accounting, economics, finance, information systems, management, and marketing. Focuses on learning skill sets necessary to access and manipulate large amounts of data and the techniques that enhance the individuals' decision-making process. Introduces some elementary Microsoft Access methods for transferring a sample of data from a database into Microsoft Excel. Illustrates how to make effective decisions using simple and multiple regression models. Provides balanced presentations illustrating the manual use of statistical techniques for understanding purposes and how to implement those techniques using the computer.

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GB 214 Marketing-Operations Fundamentals* (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): Class Code 3

Note: *Available starting in Fall 2010

Strategic competitive advantage is derived from the value a company creates for its customers through five primary value-adding activities: Designing products and services, logistics, operations, marketing and sales strategies, and bringing products and services to the market to meet customer needs and requirements. Most of these activities fall within the boundaries of operations and marketing, the two primary value adding functions within organizations. This course, therefore, covers topics that span the marketing and operational disciplines, and focuses on the fundamental concepts and processes of marketing and operations management and how effective coordination and the interface between these two primary functional areas create value for the customer, the company, and society at large.

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GB 215 Human Behavior & Organizations* (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): Class Code 3

Note: *Available starting in Fall 2010

Human Behavior and Organizations examines the behavior of people in organizations and the relationship between this behavior and organizational effectiveness. Particular attention is given to the issues and dynamics that result from the increasing diversity of the workforce and the global contexts in which people work. The course introduces students to analytical frameworks for understanding and influencing individual, group, inter-group and total organization dynamics. It increases students' awareness of and competence in dealing with people different from themselves. Through case studies, self-reflection instruments, experiential exercises, lectures and readings students develop knowledge and skills for working effectively with a diverse set of people in complex environments, diagnosing managerial problems and developing effective plans for action, taking into account the impact of external stakeholders on internal organizational dynamics.

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GB 301 Integrated Business Functions (6 credits)

Prerequisite(s): Junior-level standing and EC 111 & EC112 & GB 201 & GB 202 & GB 210

Note: Not open to students who have previously taken OM 280, MK 160 or FI 270

This course studies the interaction and interdependency of the finance, marketing and operations functions within an organization. Each of these three disciplines represents a 1.5 credit module that is integrated through the fourth project module. The project allows student teams the opportunity to work with an actual company to apply the functional knowledge by developing a new product or service and accompanying business plan.

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GB 310 Business Processes & Systems (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): GB 212, GB 213, GB214

This course introduces students to the concept of a business as an integrated set of business processes and associated systems designed to deliver value to customers. Hands-on experience with SAP, a market leading enterprise system, will demonstrate how information systems can be used to support and improve business processes. Hands-on experience with a process modeling application will demonstrate how information technology can be used to model, analyze, and simulate typical business processes. Learning about emerging technologies and basic infrastructure concepts will enable students to envision creative IT solutions to business problems. Throughout the course, students will be learning how people, processes, and systems can be integrated most effectively to achieve organizational objectives.

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GB 320 Integrated Business Project (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): GB 212 & GB 213 & GB 214 & GB 215 & Junior Standing

In this course, students work on a project team to solve real world problems for real organizations. The project enables students to develop a better understanding of how the traditional business functions are integrated in the workplace. Students review key principles in accounting, business processes, finance, management, marketing and operations within the context of project management. They will analyze the problem facing the client company, develop and evaluate a set of alternative solutions and present a program of recommendations to the sponsoring organization at the end of the semester. The project enables teams to analyze real firms' potential to introduce new goods and/or services, introduce existing goods and/or services to new markets, and/or develop other growth opportunities, as well as to present a business proposal.

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GB 401 Strategic Management (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): Senior-level standing, GB 301 or students who have credit for all three of the following courses: OM 280, MK 160 and FI 305 or FI 310

Note: Not open to students who have previously taken MG 370.

Strategic Management focuses on the job of the general manager or top management team in formulating and implementing short- and long-run corporate policy and strategy. Today, business, as well as other organizations is in the process of transformation driven by information technology and globalization; therefore strategy is formulated in a multi-faceted environment of social, political, economic, and legal entities and forces. Strategic Management is concerned with developing the "general management point of view"; this means seeing the cross-functional impact of any situation, problem, solution, proposal or decision and the key long- and short-term implications for the total enterprise from a global perspective.

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GB 410 Global Strategy (3 credits)

Prerequisite(s): GB 310 & (Corequisite or Prerequisite GB 320)

Global strategy focuses on the role of the general manager or top management team in formulating and implementing short and long-term business and corporate level strategies. In business, strategy is formulated in a multi-faceted, international environment of social, political, economic, and legal entities. In global strategy students will be analyzing the internal and external environments of the organization, formulating recommendations with respect to actions firms can take to enhance firm-level performance and sustainable competitive advantage, and suggesting ways in which those actions can be implemented which recognizing the critical long and short-term implications of their recommendations for the total enterprise.

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